Saturday, April 11, 2009

street side

My power line obsession is finally taking some kind of shape.


In a few weeks time I will be launching new work in a window exhibit at Craft Victoria and of course I am still frantically making and developing new pieces.







But for now here is a sneak peek, thanks to some recent photos taken by Terence Bogue.




















And for those who like to read about work (and you know I don't always find that essential myself!) here is the artist statement that goes along with it...






'Street side' is a body of work that references my surrounding urban environment in a deliberate response to, and extension of, my work to date. The rhythms, patterns and forms of street landscapes act as inspiration where previously rural settings and geological markings were my muse. Driven more by symbolic narrative than the desire to make functional vessels 'street side' incorporates a multiplicity of meanings. Utilising traditional techniques of pottery production and the symbolic nature of the vessel I manipulate clay to create a language in which to explore ideas.

The bottle form, with its constricted internal space, is used to evoke the feeling of a society overwhelmed by infrastructure and throttled by the pervasive presence of its resultant constructions. In contrast, my sgraffito lines take pleasure in the rhythms and quirks of the patterns this infrastructure incidentally creates. Further forms take note of a timeless beauty in industrially designed forms. 'Street side', in this sense, is a handmade salute to industry.

The exploration of a harmonious link between design, beauty and timelessness is a constant in my work, as is the creation of objects with value beyond fashion and consumerism.

In focusing on the aesthetic of man-made structures, things born of necessity and social need, I question whether an artwork that incorporates modern imagery can still aim to be timeless. I am intrigued by the idea that this work, in capturing imagery associated with a specific period of time and soon to be obsolete, may result in the work itsel being representative of an era.


The objects in this body of work are vessels. The decision as to whether they are functional, sculptural, conceptual or purely ornamental I leave to the user or observer.


ceramic insulator cups

9 comments:

andrew widdis said...

lovely work Sophie.
Can't wait to see the final selection in the window exhibit at Craft Victoria.

Wen said...

The photographs of your new work are great (as of course, is the work!) I love the relationship that is found between the pairs. I think it's something to do with the fact that you never see a power line in isolation they are always linked together.

carole epp said...

This work is absolutely stunning! Great statement too, thanks for sharing.

Steph Bond @ Bondville said...

Hi Sophie, these are incredible. Can't wait to cover them when they are launched :)
Steph

Sophie Milne said...

Thanks all! I really appreciate the feedback. I've been feeling a little nervous about how these pieces will be received as they are quite different to my previous work.

andrew widdis said...

Given the feed back, I would suspect a reworking is in order?

shannon said...

These are so beautiful. I can't wait to see them in the flesh. Isn't Terence the absolute best photographer?

jimgottuso said...

lovely bottles and i believe that "in capturing imagery associated with a specific period of time and soon to be obsolete, may (it will) result in the work itself being representative of an era." cannot wait until telephone and power lines harken to the distant and maybe not so distant past.

Elk said...

I love these, telegraph poles are indeed such a fascinating graphic element, I've always loved driving along at sunset and the way the telegraph poles and trees make this stunning silhouette against the sky. This work reminds me of that... I hope some come to Sydney soon